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Soybean singulation
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kaky9236
Posted 10/17/2016 09:01 (#5585949)
Subject: Soybean singulation


ne nebraska
I run a 1770 planter with the esets, and love the job it does in corn, but I never did like the way it metered soybeans. Don't get me wrong, it is so much further ahead than the controlled spill of the old soybean cups, but I liked the way the kinze and deere brush meters drop them in a single row, instead of the triple row like the deere vac meters. I see that precision planting makes a singulator and plate for the eset meter. Has anyone done any testing to determine how important soybean singulation is? I have walked stands of my beans and the spacing could definitely be better, but wondering how important it is. There is such a variety of ways to plant beans and can be so dependent on weather and such, but want to give them the best chance they can have also. This is 50-80 bpa yield potential, irr and dryland, 30" rows.
Curious on thoughts I get about this.
Thanks.
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Centuryfarm
Posted 10/17/2016 09:13 (#5585959 - in reply to #5585949)
Subject: RE: Soybean singulation


Singulation in soybeans is overrated. The only thing you should be concerned about is if it can drop seeds per acre accurately.
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iseedit
Posted 10/17/2016 09:16 (#5585964 - in reply to #5585949)
Subject: RE: Soybean singulation



central - east central Minnesota -

kaky9236 - 10/17/2016 09:01 I run a 1770 planter with the esets, and love the job it does in corn, but I never did like the way it metered soybeans. Don't get me wrong, it is so much further ahead than the controlled spill of the old soybean cups, but I liked the way the kinze and deere brush meters drop them in a single row, instead of the triple row like the deere vac meters. I see that precision planting makes a singulator and plate for the eset meter. Has anyone done any testing to determine how important soybean singulation is? I have walked stands of my beans and the spacing could definitely be better, but wondering how important it is. There is such a variety of ways to plant beans and can be so dependent on weather and such, but want to give them the best chance they can have also. This is 50-80 bpa yield potential, irr and dryland, 30" rows. Curious on thoughts I get about this. Thanks.

There have been university tests for seed singulation spacing and such - It is inconclusive and has no value to ultimate yields. Unlike corn plants - soybeans compensate for all our planting "sins" . . . .

You can screw up and plant 200000 seeds per acre and "bunch" the majority of them up in the first few yards and oddly space out the rest and the yield would be the same as precisely spaced seeds. Same with seed depth, screw up an plant too deep or too shallow and they seem to yield the same . . . . ..

Now throw in the different row spacing's and the plant still compensates and adjusts it growing needs accordingly to yield as it sees fit for all the environmental and soil conditions . . .. . . .

Long story short - don't waste too much money or time on soybean singulation gizmos' . . . . .



Edited by iseedit 10/17/2016 09:30
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caseihfarmer
Posted 10/17/2016 09:19 (#5585970 - in reply to #5585949)
Subject: RE: Soybean singulation


East Central, Nebraska
if you think that your soybean singulation is poor you should see how bad my 1990 air drill does. never the less the beans that go through that consistently do better than the 30 inch row soybeans that are singulated way better with a corn type meter. I cant see how it would be a huge deal in regards to yield, now speed of canopy due to singulation is another story, which could be responsible for letting a weed compete with a plant.
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Mattchu60
Posted 10/17/2016 09:23 (#5585980 - in reply to #5585949)
Subject: RE: Soybean singulation


NC IA
A few years ago when the spring was so wet no one could plant our neighbor spread his soybeans and then worked them in lightly with a field cultivator. We managed to get ours planted normally - theirs did just as good as ours. I don't think spacing matters much, more how thick they are planted.
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Leene
Posted 10/17/2016 09:24 (#5585983 - in reply to #5585949)
Subject: RE: Soybean singulation


Franklin NE
Seed depth to me is more important. Just my two cents worth.
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Swenny79
Posted 10/17/2016 10:57 (#5586136 - in reply to #5585949)
Subject: RE: Soybean singulation


Concordia, KS
kaky9236, they are on an angled, triple row so that they hit the vac cutoff brush and different times and drop as a single bean. I don't think you can get it any better than that. Have you seen beans dropped in clumps behind your planter?

Seeding depth is a much more important factor than singulation in soybeans.
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JDAmericanFarmer
Posted 10/17/2016 13:39 (#5586350 - in reply to #5586136)
Subject: RE: Soybean singulation


Central MN
Yep I have esets for corn and the Jd soybean discs. Even though the holes for seeds are angled to hit the cut off flap at different times it still seems the drop in groups of 3, dad doesn't like that at all and wants the spacing to be better, he wants to give them the best chance possible as well. I tried some different speeds this spring to see if that helps, I didn't get to look at all my speeds and compare but I think the spacing at 4.5 mph looked better than 5-6 mph. Seems corn likes 4.5 mph too. But I'm gonna try some speed tests again this spring, how fast are you planting?
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Swenny79
Posted 10/18/2016 08:22 (#5587728 - in reply to #5586350)
Subject: RE: Soybean singulation


Concordia, KS
Generally between 4 and 5 mph.
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flatlick farmer
Posted 10/17/2016 12:28 (#5586252 - in reply to #5585949)
Subject: RE: Soybean singulation



West Kentucky
We swapped from a kinze brush meter to a deere vac meter several years back. Once of the biggest things I noticed is how much better job it did with singulation over brush meters. So, I guess every situation is different, but I don't think it makes a difference either way on yield.
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Survivor
Posted 10/17/2016 13:20 (#5586319 - in reply to #5586252)
Subject: RE: Soybean singulation


Moreauville LA
My thoughts from HERE.

The bulk of crop is grown on 36 & 38" rows. With there being fewer row feet per acre, I have seen beans planted with planters that hill dropped 5-6 seeds then strung out 2 then repeat.

I can guarantee those two outproduced the hill of 5. Personally I do believe fairly uniform spacing is important as well as in grain sorghum.
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tkoppel
Posted 10/17/2016 13:55 (#5586371 - in reply to #5586319)
Subject: RE: Soybean singulation


Sanilac Co. Michigan
I think the only ones that make more money over seed singulation are the equipment salesmen.
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kaky9236
Posted 10/17/2016 15:06 (#5586442 - in reply to #5585949)
Subject: RE: Soybean singulation


ne nebraska
I should add, right now we plant from 125k to 160k. What if, we could singulate and space them, and drop at 100k, or 90k? I wouldn't do that full scale right outta the gate, but maybe would try some.
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iseedit
Posted 10/17/2016 17:18 (#5586587 - in reply to #5586442)
Subject: RE: Soybean singulation



central - east central Minnesota -

kaky9236 - 10/17/2016 15:06 I should add, right now we plant from 125k to 160k. What if, we could singulate and space them, and drop at 100k, or 90k? I wouldn't do that full scale right outta the gate, but maybe would try some.

In Theory - yes, that would compute . . . . . .  in reality - wouldn't matter (at least with todays beans/genetics'). The bean plant will compensate and "do it's thing" to reproduce within its means.

 

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tkoppel
Posted 10/17/2016 17:38 (#5586610 - in reply to #5586442)
Subject: RE: Soybean singulation


Sanilac Co. Michigan
kaky9236 - 10/17/2016 15:06

I should add, right now we plant from 125k to 160k. What if, we could singulate and space them, and drop at 100k, or 90k? I wouldn't do that full scale right outta the gate, but maybe would try some.


Depends a little on your climate and how far north you are. In an ideal world that kind of seed drop, evenly, works fine. Problem will arise in an imperfect year of slow development and less than ideal canopy closure and subsequent weed pressure. Not that you have an issue with soil structure or ever plant in less than ideal conditions, but a little heavier seed drop can help overcome some minor crusting conditions before you need to locate a rotary hoe.





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pupdaddy12003
Posted 10/18/2016 02:36 (#5587414 - in reply to #5586442)
Subject: RE: Soybean singulation



NW Central Ohio
"here" in Ohio, one of the soybean researchers has stated that 90,000 would probably be his lower limit on "plants per acre" to produce an average crop. Cutting your seeding rate, and only achieving 90-95% of that number (Because of emergence, insects, etc.) might not be a wise move. I think we can go "too" low on population....if you get a situation where you need more flowers in the top third of the plant to make average yield...(Like this summer with horribly hot dry conditions early where blooms were aborting every day) you might not be giving your crop a chance. Of course...then there's the insurance factor. If you insure your yield, and you don't produce it...well gee, maybe you can survive on an insurance payment. This choice is really making it crazy deciding how to be a profitable producer.
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