AgTalk Home
AgTalk Home
Search Forums | Classifieds (88) | Skins | Language
You are logged in as a guest. ( logon | register )

how to calibrate IH 5100 and deere 8300 drills ?
Jump to page : 1
Now viewing page 1 [50 messages per page]
View previous thread :: View next thread
   Forums List -> Machinery TalkMessage format
 
tommyw-5088
Posted 6/29/2008 07:44 (#406601)
Subject: how to calibrate IH 5100 and deere 8300 drills ?


Central Texas , York Rife Freemason
planted winter peas last year ,"where" i got the actual 50# per acre i needed i have the best sudan i have ever raised.

i had the 30 acre test field planted before i finally got the grain drill set right .

my drills are not a soybean special drill ,but will plant peas okay ,just need a accurate way to calibrate them ?.

TIA
Top of the page Bottom of the page
Phred
Posted 6/29/2008 08:29 (#406615 - in reply to #406601)
Subject: RE: how to calibrate IH 5100 and deere 8300 drills ?


NE Mo
Not easy, but we jack up one wheel, put seed over one or two feed wheels. Measure the circumference of the wheel. Decide how many seeds you want per foot. Turn the wheel 3-4 turns and catch the seed from each feed roll. Devide the counted seeds by the # of feet the wheel would have traveled. Not that difficult, but a little time consuming.

Different seed lots will feed differently, and seed treatments will affect the seed wheel as well
Top of the page Bottom of the page
Pofarmer
Posted 6/29/2008 08:34 (#406620 - in reply to #406601)
Subject: Re: how to calibrate IH 5100 and deere 8300 drills ?



I have taken one seed hose lose and tied a plastic bag to it before, then drive a measured distance and do the math. I have also done the wheel spin method Phred used. Problem there is figuring for any slip, and speed can change the rates. You need a pretty accurate scale to make it work. You can fill the whole drill, put a tarp under it and spin the wheel, that get's you more volume to work with. Generally spin the wheel for 1000 feet. Your arms will be tired!!!
Top of the page Bottom of the page
Carl In Georgia
Posted 6/29/2008 08:56 (#406633 - in reply to #406601)
Subject: Calibrating Drills



Ashburn, GA, (very close to Heaven!)

I just finished setting a couple of no till drills this week for soybeans.

Set your "cups" levers to match the size seed you have, according to the manual. Smaller seed set it close to the top, more "closed" and further down for larger seeded stuff like soybeans for example. I had a farmer trip a couple of his down last fall on wheat, and it made a mess across a few fields, dropping lots more seed than necessary in a few rows. This is a common mistake I think I have seen farmers make.

Figure out how many seed you want per foot of row. I count out 250 soybeans and, using a funnel, drop them into a 100 ml graduated cylinder. This tells me how many milliliters I have per 250 seeds in that seed lot; 250 is pretty close to the number I am going to plant per 50 feet of row in 15 inch rows. Nevertheless, depending on your desired drop rate, use the ml/250 seed amount to determine a factor to find out how many milliliters of seed you need on 50 feet of your row.

Get about two quarts of seed and pour them into the drill over two rows that you choose to calibrate. Believe me, it is better to do this above only two rows at the shelter. I have actually ridden grain drills in the field down 50 feet of row, and am not sure that is too smart...

Jack the drive wheel of the drill up, and engage the drive wheel. Measure the circumference of the drive wheel, and calculate the number of revolutions required to travel 50 feet.

Set the drill chute opening close to what you think it might be, probably some pretty accurate suggested settings in the manual. Disconnect two of the drop tubes and put a couple of drink cups under them. Have somebody rotate the drive wheel and "charge" the drill cups and start the drop down the tubes, stopping the valve stem at a good reference point. Empty your drink cups, you're ready to check calibration.

Next have the person rotate the tires the number of revolutions required to travel 50 feet of row while you catch the seed in your drink cups. Pour the seed through a funnel into your calibration tube and see how close you are to the number of milliliters you need. Adjust until you get the desire drop. I always calibrate both sides of the drill, as they are not always uniform. Whenever I change the chute width setting, I recharge the drill cups and tubes to adapt to the new setting. Once you get the rate you want, it's good to run two or three times to verify you are getting a good and accurate average drop rate.

I learned how to do this from Dr. Dewey Lee, corn and small grains specialist with the University of Georgia in Tifton. It has been a valuable addition to my services with small grains and drilled soybeans. It takes a little while to do, but at today's prices, we need to do everything possible to be sure we are using the optimum drop rate for seed, both for seed costs and agronomic performance.

I have a crude Excel spreadsheet set up to do some calculating for me. Email address is in my profile, if you want it.





(carl_drill_SM.JPG)



(Cylinder_100ML.JPG)



(Funnel.JPG)



Attachments
----------------
Attachments carl_drill_SM.JPG (35KB - 809 downloads)
Attachments Cylinder_100ML.JPG (15KB - 753 downloads)
Attachments Funnel.JPG (25KB - 725 downloads)
Top of the page Bottom of the page
Greywolf
Posted 6/29/2008 09:07 (#406641 - in reply to #406633)
Subject: Re: how to calibrate IH 5100 and deere 8300 drills ?



Aberdeen MS
One thing by jacking the wheel up and going by circumference is that it is not really accurate for field conditions.

Total distance traveled per revolution MAY change due to field conditions.

Same idea as calibrating a spray monitor for speed calibration via distance traveled. It ALWAYS recommended to do the calibration in field conditions with a half full tank. Full tank will be different than an empty tank, so the half is the medium to average out. Hard surfaced road will give different distance traveled per revolution than a softer field surface.

It all depends on how "picky" you really want to be.
Top of the page Bottom of the page
Jon S
Posted 6/29/2008 09:33 (#406664 - in reply to #406601)
Subject: RE: how to calibrate IH 5100 and deere 8300 drills ?



I'm sure there are a few different ways, but here's the way I do it:

Given: Seed count of 3100. Using JD 750 drill on 7.5 in spacing


Tools needed - Gram Scale. Plastic cups. Flags. Measuring Wheel.


Measure 100 feet

Remove seed tube, sit on drill (be careful if Plowboy happens to be driving Surprised), have operator start planting at normal planting speed before you get to the first flag and continue to drive past the second flag, collect seed with cup in 100 feet.

Weigh seed in grams. (Let's say you got 42 grams in 100 ft) 42 grams/ 100 feet = 0.42 grams per foot. 0.42 grams X 69,696 feet (distance one 7.5 inch unit travels to equal one acre) = 29,272 grams per acre. 29,272 grams/ 454 (454 grams = 1 lb) = 64.5 lbs per acre.

64.5 lbs per acre X 3100 seed count = 199,950 seeds per acre.

Adjust for germination, check depth.

 

Note: I have also found that if the desired rate is incorrect, a quick math calculation will get the error corrected fairly accurately.

For example: I want 180,000 and I just dropped 200,000 on Notch 21. 180/200 = .9. Take Notch 21 X .9 = 18.9. Set drill to 19 and recheck.

Top of the page Bottom of the page
unifarmor
Posted 6/29/2008 11:21 (#406732 - in reply to #406664)
Subject: Seed meter scale thing



Western Oregon
I have a scale like a fertilizer density meter. You drive a set distance and weigh the seed. No more turning the wheel and running the calculator!

Try www.acuscale.com

Doesn't work so well on grass seed or really light seed and really low planting rates but is wonderful for wheat!

Edited by unifarmor 6/29/2008 11:22
Top of the page Bottom of the page
JohnW
Posted 6/29/2008 12:14 (#406759 - in reply to #406601)
Subject: RE: how to calibrate IH 5100 and deere 8300 drills ?


NW Washington
No need to plow the same ground twice, so check out his bulletin from North Dakota on how to calibrate a grain drill.

http://www.ag.ndsu.edu/pubs/ageng/machine/ae1144w.htm
Top of the page Bottom of the page
plowboy
Posted 6/29/2008 12:39 (#406772 - in reply to #406601)
Subject: Re: how to calibrate IH 5100 and deere 8300 drills ?



Brazilton KS
The methodology of spinning the wheel and weighing or counting is pretty well covered already. All I will add is that if you mark the tire and pull the drill through the field for a couple revolutions and then measure how far it took to make the revolutions, you can obtain an accurate rolling circumference to use for the calculations.


Top of the page Bottom of the page
Jump to page : 1
Now viewing page 1 [50 messages per page]
Jump to forum :
Search this forum
Printer friendly version
E-mail a link to this thread

(Delete cookies)