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sycle type mower vs discbine
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IAdairyman
Posted 6/10/2007 12:14 (#160685)
Subject: sycle type mower vs discbine


We are in need of a new mower and are contemplating wether or not to switch to a discbine or just upgrade to another sycle type mower. We currently cut with a NH 12' 499 and it's starting to need more and more repairs.

What are the benefits/drawbacks from going from the 499 to a discbine?
Do the discbines pick up more dirt?
Whats the difference between the two in maitenance?
What brands are good and bad? We have NH, JD, Krone, Hestton, and IH dealers (also MacDon if they make discbines).
Also what type of rolls for alfalfa and grass hay? rubber-rubber, rubber-steel, etc.
What do we need to look over when looking at one?
How many acres/hr can you cut with your discbine and what width?
I'm sure there will be more questions to come...
Jake
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JoshA
Posted 6/10/2007 13:26 (#160702 - in reply to #160685)
Subject: RE: sycle type mower vs discbine



Alberta, Canada
I can't answer all of your questions, however...

A discbine cuts MUCH faster than a sickle type (haybine), and will pick up the crop much better. Many downed crops that a haybine can't get, the discbine will fly through without caring. You do have to change the knives frequently enough, but that's a simple job usually, and overall there is much less maintenance than a sickle mower. Depending on the conditioner, they're much gentler on crops than a haybine as well. Roller conditioners are preferred for delicate crops like Alfalfa.

I have heard many bad things about the JD MoCo, but haven't yet run one myself. Have neighbors that run straight John Deere, but run either a CaseIH or Hesston for cutting equipment.
-Josh
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HT67
Posted 6/10/2007 13:59 (#160709 - in reply to #160685)
Subject: Re: sycle type mower vs discbine


Virginia
After cutting with a disc mower conditioner for 5 years I would quit making hay if I had to mow with a sickle machine. Only advantage to a sickle is it gets along a little better in rocks. Thats why I put off getting one as long as I did. The rocks are not as much a problem as I anticipated. I don't feel they pick up any more dirt. Maintenance on disc machines is much lower, I have found. Started out with a New Idea 5312 12' center pivot. Was absolutely a piece of junk! Other New Ideas are probably OK. Gears went out on it and needed another one. Dealer I bought from sells JD and Gehl. Couldn't get a JD or NH so I ended up with a 2365 Gehl. Gehl no longer makes them any more. If buying today would be JD, NH or Hesston. Guys here are beginning to like the Hesston more and more. They claim that comparing mowing with JD, NH and Hesston the hay dries much quicker with the Hesston. Not sure if they are steel-rubber rolls or just steel. I'm not that familiar with Hesston. I Can easily cut 7 acres an hour with a 10' machine. I don't have any problems with my Gehl other than the fact they quit making them and down the road what will be the parts availability? I've been cutting hay for 50 years and only really started enjoying doing it the first time I mowed with a disc machine. Hope this helps.
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jd6400
Posted 6/10/2007 14:20 (#160720 - in reply to #160685)
Subject: RE: sycle type mower vs discbine



I think you will be very happy with a disc, I use a NI 5209 and cut 5 to 7/ac. per hour depending on conditions. I have rubber conditioning rolls but I`ve heard on hear most like steel on steel. Have never had any problem with dirt , it takes me about 20 min to change blades and it costs around 24.00. Vermeer has a pretty slick setup for the blades but don`t know how they have held up.
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Phred
Posted 6/10/2007 14:57 (#160731 - in reply to #160685)
Subject: RE: sycle type mower vs discbine


NE Mo
For what it is worth, a personal observation. I do not have either one, but have nieghbors do my hay. One has a disc machine, the other a sickle machine. Mowing first cutting clover, the regrowth of the crop was smaller, not as tall after two weeks, where the disc mower was used. Also, it looked to be thinner too. But as others have said, the disc will cover the ground much faster.
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J. Sheehan
Posted 6/10/2007 15:16 (#160737 - in reply to #160685)
Subject: RE: sycle type mower vs discbine


Sunnyside, WA
I would go towards a disc bine. I think it was about 10-12 years ago when I lived in MN that it was a very wet spring/early summer. Took us 5 hours to cut 5 acres with the sickle machine so we tried out a 12' disc mower. It never left until two years ago when they upgraded to a 15'.

I bought a Hesston 15' three years ago and have done very little to it. Replaced 6 non-greaseable bearings on the conditioners and accelerator rolls, put a new spring and pulley on the main drive belt, and upgraded the 3pt hitch some. Other than that, just normal knife replacement. And we have some rocks to contend with, but I use a roller before planting triticale to try to push them down. You could never get me back in a sickle machine.

Cut about 10 acres per hour average with the 15' going 8mph. Bump to 10.5 and cover about 13 acres per hour. Take a little more hp to run a disc machine, but that has more to do with the speed and how much these big machines can throw a tractor around.

Steel on steel conditioners have always been my favorite, but that's personal preference. I would stay far away from the tine conditioners for alfalfa.

We run all JD tractors, but I would stay away from JD mowers. In true hay country out here, JD is a non contender. Hesston #1 and NH #2

Edited by J. Sheehan 6/10/2007 16:04
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cow27
Posted 6/10/2007 15:22 (#160741 - in reply to #160731)
Subject: RE: sycle type mower vs discbine



Bloomer WI
We first had a 945 JD MOCO (13ft) traded in 499 and 1014 hesston could out cut the 2 combined It had impeller conditioning very hard on alfalfa leaves but cut very clean. Traded in for Gehl 2415 (15 ft) because could split windrow in middle, had to run on hay when laid out with JD. I can cut 12 mph, 10 acres per hour I do believe the JD did cut cleaner. Also only need 2 remotes verses 3 for JD. I cut 76 acres in one day started @ 9:30 done @ 5:00. Cut with 150 HP FWA need it with hills.
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aje
Posted 6/10/2007 15:54 (#160750 - in reply to #160685)
Subject: RE: sickle type mower vs discbine



Remsen, IA
I started with a NH sickle 499 12 years ago, went to a CIH rotary 8312 (made by Hesston) and then went to a JD rotary 956. Personally I'd never even consider going back to a sickle machine. I've run with and/or demoed Hesston, Krone, NH and Kuhn. For our conditions no other machine has matched the short cutting height, speed or dry down of the 956. As the custom work expanded we now run 3 of the 956 machines with roll conditioners although hay acres are down with the high price of corn this year and we could cut back to 2 machines. They do take more power to run if you want to go fast but if you have a smooth field you can easily cut 20 acres per hour with one machine. For us, in our conditions they have been very reliable machines that keep the customers happy.



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gbfarmer
Posted 6/10/2007 16:21 (#160758 - in reply to #160685)
Subject: RE: sycle type mower vs discbine


SE MN
We went from a 499 to a New Holland 1431 discbine and are very glad we did. We average 10-12 acres/hour with the 1431. We just traded for a new 1431 and the only reason we did is because the dealer had somebody looking for a used one and he didn't have one at the time. The only thing I have done to the 1431 is either change or turn the knives before each cutting and change the oil in the gear boxes. It is a great machine and I would never go back to a sickle.
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john holland
Posted 6/10/2007 16:57 (#160771 - in reply to #160685)
Subject: Re: sycle type mower vs discbine


SE MN
We have always used a nh 489 and it has served us well. We have the following concerns with a disc machine maybe somebody can tell me how accurate they are:

the extra speed is only useful if you have smooth, big fields and a tractor that lets you easily change speeds for corners/turning around

The disc leaves a more ragged cut which means less and slower regrowth (we keep our sickle and guards in good shape)

If you do have rock or foreign object problems the disc is much more money to fix. I have heard that just one disc module would be more than a new sickle and all new guards.

It looks like most are happy with the disc, so maybe we are missing the boat.

Have a day.
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Pofarmer
Posted 6/10/2007 17:16 (#160777 - in reply to #160685)
Subject: Re: sycle type mower vs discbine



We made the very switch you are contemplating last year. Went from a 499 to a Vermeer 1030. I just couldn't hardly get the 499 to run all day without breaking something. The Vermeer is 13'11" and it's not at all hard to push 10 acres an hour. Yes, rocks can be hard on the disc machines. If you are in rocks, tilt the cutterbar back and put more tension on the float springs. Our is on year too old to have the new blade change system so can't comment on that. However, whenever we need to change discs it will get it.

As far as regrowth, I don't see any difference at all. When we had the 499 we also had a Gehl discmower, actually still have it. We've cut fields on either side of a fenceline, one with the 499 and one with the discmower and couldn't tell any difference. I think the main thing is to keep the knives sharp and not tilt the cutterbar on the discmachine so much it scalps.

The disc machine is a joy to run in down and tangled crops, or just plain heavy grass. I wouldn't even try to run the 499 in 3 ton Bromegrass.

My personal preference for rolls would be Hesstons rubber on steel. We had a Gehl with that setup and I always liked it. Some say the newer tine conditioners are O.K. I haven't been overly impressed with the conditioning on the Vermeer. Other than that, it has been absolutely trouble free. I don't know what it would take to make me go back to a sickle machine.
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AGCOfan
Posted 6/10/2007 18:22 (#160795 - in reply to #160771)
Subject: Re: No contest....



S.W. Manitoba
Went from a NH haybine to a NH disc bine in '04. Never ever go back. Run a 13'6" 1431 NH with a 7130 Magnum only because the extra hp is good on hills, it has a wider stance so we can lay it out as wide as it will go and just straddle the row and the 7130 doesn't get used much since we got the 8970 Genesis. We ran it for a bit with a TS100A NH we were demoing but didn't handle our hills that well. I know guys around here that with a new disc bine will go 15mph. Most only go 10-12 though. I don't know of a single new haybine around. NH dealer hasn't sold one in along time. I like the Hesston better then the NH since the deck is smooth where the NH has a pocket under it where junk collects.

Take care,

Nathan

Edited by AGCOfan 6/10/2007 18:25




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iseedit
Posted 6/10/2007 18:42 (#160803 - in reply to #160777)
Subject: Re: I couldn't agree more . . . down and tangled crops ~



central - east central Minnesota -
I couldn't agree more with Pofarmer - Just finished up putting up first crop. Heavy crop and most of it was down/tangled alfalfa (just at bud stage). It was slow going with the new cycle mower. From my past experence with disk mowers would have been able to move much fast in the down/tangle stuff. I don't thing the disk mowers add anymore dirt to the hay then a cycle mower.



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Phred
Posted 6/10/2007 20:11 (#160835 - in reply to #160777)
Subject: Re: sycle type mower vs discbine


NE Mo
Is the new Vermeer the one with the flails rather than ruber and steel rollers?
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Cliff SEIA
Posted 6/10/2007 20:11 (#160836 - in reply to #160685)
Subject: RE: sycle type mower vs discbine


We went from an IH 1190 mower conditioner to a straight 9' disk mower in '02 and cut our mowing time in half.  This year we bought a Kuhn FC4000G 13' center pivot conditioner with the Finger Comb II conditioner and I really like it.  The Finger Comb II conditioner is alot more gentle than the other brands impeller conditioner and if your willing to take 30-40 seconds to adjust it for the conditions your in even in straight alfalfa leaf loss is almost zero and so far even under less than ideal drying conditions we haven't had any hay on the ground longer than about 55 hours, with grass hay we've been able to mow late one morning and bale the following afternoon. 

I started out looking mostly at the Hesston and Case IH machines but this Kuhn was priced right and the more I looked at it the more I liked it.  The Kuhn is 1,200lbs heavier than a comparable Hesston, Case IH or New Holland, has pressure lubricated gear boxes and has no drive belts or chains.  Total maintance on the Kuhn is six U joints, three gear boxes and the cutterbar.  I wasn't totally sold on the impeller conditioner until I used it and I'll put it up against a roller machine in alfalfa anytime.   





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Pofarmer
Posted 6/10/2007 21:26 (#160863 - in reply to #160835)
Subject: Re: sycle type mower vs discbine



No, this one has the steel on steel, it almost looks like angle irons welded on the round pipe that intermesh. I'd like to see one of the paddle tine conditioners work. On the Vermeer, you can remove the conditioner unit, and replace it with another type, and, it looks like it wouldn't be that big of a job.
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Jim
Posted 6/10/2007 21:53 (#160869 - in reply to #160685)
Subject: RE: sycle type mower vs discbine - golf courses


Driftless SW Wisconsin

This is an interesting thread. There are definite advantages to a disc type mower compared to sicle bar type. There are a couple posts above that also discuss the regrowth that seems to favor the sicle.

There are a number of different ways to look at the choice. I just wanted to comment on the regrowth issue.

I think you can liken a disc type haybine to a rotary type mower (horizontal spinning blades that cut by impact once the tip speed reaches a certain vcritical velocity).

I think you can like a sicle bar type mower to a reel type grass mower where thethe cutting action is a shear type cut between a moving blade and a stationary guard or knife.

No first class golf course would use a rotary mower on the fairways - they use reel type mowers. Rotaries are used on the roughs. A reel type (and properly maintained) sicle bar mower will both give you a cleaner cut of each grass blade and ultimately better regrowth due to shear rather than the rather ragged edge cut left by ANY brand impact/rotary/disc mower.

However this is only one part of the choice. After a weekend using a neighbors moco I think the best thing for my uneven ground conditions would be a sicle bar type with wheels or skids very close to the cutter bar, not way in the back as they are on most mower/conditioners. This is a big part of why I plugged it up - cannot hold consistent cutting height on rougher ground with the wheels that far from the cutter bar.

I don't have a lot of area to cover. I saw a demo in Kansas where a Reese mower with a vertical tedder or whatever they call it really did a nice job with fast drying. I think they are from NZ. But this is a different scale than most of you other posters.

Quality regrowth from this type Sicle bar setup would also be attractive. jmho.

Jim at Dawn



Edited by Jim 6/10/2007 21:56
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Pofarmer
Posted 6/10/2007 22:07 (#160874 - in reply to #160869)
Subject: Re: sycle type mower vs discbine



"After a weekend using a neighbors moco I think the best thing for my uneven ground conditions would be a sicle bar type with wheels or skids very close to the cutter bar, not way in the back as they are on most mower/conditioners."

I think you need to define "uneven". I cut a 10 acre patch the other day with the Vermeer with no less than 3 waterways in it with fairly steep slopes. I only had one where I finally had to cut the water way out because it got too steep to cut across. It was probably a 45 degree slope about 6 feet long. The wheels on a moco don't have a whole lot to do with the height control of the cutterbar, although, the positions of the wheels in relation to the cutterbar does obviously relate to the amount of downpressure or lift the cutterbar has in relation to the ground. In other words, what I'm saying, is you needed to adjust the shoes, the cutterbar tilt, and the float springs, to make it do what you wanted to do.
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Cliff SEIA
Posted 6/10/2007 22:20 (#160881 - in reply to #160869)
Subject: RE: sycle type mower vs discbine - golf courses


When it comes to regrowth I've seen studies that show the sickle is better, some that say a disc is actually better and some that say there is no difference.  The key with a disc mower is to keep sharp blades on it and to spend some time walking the field to see what is going on.  In our case even if a disc mower causes a 5% decrease in regrowth (about 2 days on a one month mowing cycle) the increased capacity of the disc mower would more than make up for the possiblity of the hay being two days behind at the next mowing.  I know a couple of people in Deere's hay equipment marketing department and they say that almost 100% of their sickle machines are sold out west where they tend to have easier mowing conditions.
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iseedit
Posted 6/10/2007 22:35 (#160895 - in reply to #160881)
Subject: RE: Management issue - have to have sharp knifes



central - east central Minnesota -

Have to agree with Cliff - One of the keys to disc cutters is sharp knives. If they are kept sharp they will slice just as well as a sycle. Looking at used disc mowers at dealers shows very poor maintinance of knives. I dought there would be two days regrowth difference if both cutter heads were in the same condition - same condition dull or sharp, regrowth would be simular. I've seen sycles and rock guards that are worthless due to poor maintinance and do a tearing job at the grass and alfalfa. Maintinance is key to top management

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Greg Stremel
Posted 6/10/2007 22:43 (#160901 - in reply to #160709)
Subject: Re: Maybe one reason I enjoy cutting with a disc mower


Southwest Missouri
so much is because I started with a sickle. I remember having to watch all the time to see when, not if, it plugged. Then I had to back up, hoping friction would dislodge the plug, then pulling it out by hand, then starting all over again.

Now, cutting hay is really a job I really enjoy. I cut fast, get a lot done, and have very few problems. The only time I plugged my NH 411 discbine was when the rollers had lost a lot of rubber and the hay started wrapping. Around here, I have not heard of anyone regretting going to the disc.
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Pofarmer
Posted 6/10/2007 23:02 (#160923 - in reply to #160895)
Subject: Re: sycle type mower vs discbine



I would much rather try to keep a disc cutterbar sharp and maintained than a cycle(shudder).
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Downwardspiral
Posted 6/10/2007 23:25 (#160939 - in reply to #160685)
Subject: Re: sycle type mower vs discbine



Northern Indiana
Discbine. That is a no-brainer. I have an older 411 NH that we keep in good shape. Newer ones I am sure are better. But I would rather take a beating than go back to a sickle mower.
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Plow79
Posted 6/10/2007 23:57 (#160960 - in reply to #160836)
Subject: RE: sycle type mower vs discbine



Chilliwack BC
Just thought I'd comment on your experiences with flail vs crimping. We were running a New Holland 1431, 13ft rubber crimpers and borrowed our uncles 1432, same width with flail instead and the flails dried down noticably quicker. They also take more power to run. The New Holland dealer doesn't bring in any rubber roller discbine machines anymore, our is 8 years old. I figure rubber rollers would be for alfalfa where there is less crop dammage, but there's very little of that grown around here.

As far as sickle vs disc, there have been NO new sickle machines sold around here for probably 20 years. This is a guess but I'd say Deere and New Holland are both around #1 for discbine sales here with Hesston behind them. That is just a guess from what I see in the fields.

Pierre
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Seth_ia
Posted 6/11/2007 00:41 (#160973 - in reply to #160685)
Subject: It depends


I have some experience with both. If your buying new, then I'd buy a discbine no question. I have rented a hesston discbine with steel on steel and was real impressed with the conditioning. I bought a used disc mower some time back and love the disc mower in opperation, but would never buy another used one. Too many idiot abuse disc mowers. I'm looking to up grade right now and am looking at Hesston haybines. I'm concerned that my disc mower is going to need way too much money put in it. Disc mower parts seem expensive. For me speed is a limited issue. The only hay I do is small odd shaped fields that we can't get 12row equipment into. I find that the fields tend to be so small and odd shaped, plus rough, that 7mph is about top for me even with a disc type cutter.
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Ben
Posted 6/11/2007 07:04 (#161012 - in reply to #160685)
Subject: RE: sycle type mower vs discbine


North Mo.
I think it is a mute point as I am not sure you can even find a sickle mower cond.. That said on our fields that are rough speed is not a issue with my 820 jd sickle cond. with STUB guards I can go as fast as I want and stay on the tractor. I also can pull it easily with 85 to 90 hp tractor at that speed maybe 5 to 7 mph. They do not like rocks sticks or storm debri where a disc will take that stuff up to a point. At some point guards and sickle parts will become hard to find.
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HT67
Posted 6/11/2007 07:12 (#161015 - in reply to #160923)
Subject: Re: sycle type mower vs discbine


Virginia
I agree Pofarmer. A 4" disc grinder and 10-15 minutes later you can have a discbine cutting pretty good. About as long as it takes to replace one section in a sickle machine. No place on my farm for a sickle mower.
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David in MD
Posted 6/11/2007 07:58 (#161029 - in reply to #160685)
Subject: RE: sycle type mower vs discbine



I went from a JD 1209 sickle bar moco to a JD 926 disk moco and would definitely recomend the disk moco. I ran the sickle mower nicely with a 60 hp tractor and could probably get by with 40 hp. I run the disk moco with a 100 hp tractor because it is too much for the 60 hp tractor. For me to do the same job I'm using almost twice as much fuel. The benefit is you can mow more acreage in less time. If the hay is standing and your knife is good the sickle mower will cut better otherwise they are about equal. It's alot easier to replace blades on the disk moco than to deal with sections, guards, hold down clips, wear plates, and the pickup real. The only thing I don't like about the JD 926 is that the conditioning rolls are relatively narrow so I have to run a tedder afterwards to spread the hay out to the full width for drying. The NH conditioning rolls are quite a bit wider so I would assume it would spread the hay wider but I've never run one myself.
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[email protected]
Posted 6/11/2007 08:24 (#161034 - in reply to #160881)
Subject: RE: sycle type mower vs discbine - golf courses


North Cental Mo.
The last sickle mower we had Cliff was a 14" heston, and that will be the last one. I've turned, and pulled more wads of hay out of it than I care to remember. We then went to a 9' deere cutter bar (disk) then we went to a 956 Deere Swather (disc) Wow can we mow the hay with that, and it's got the quick hitch hook up, which I love. The only downfall is it is a load to pull. Originally I put it on a 7410 deere, and it will pull it, but not nearly as good as my 7710, I think we may try it on our 8130 this year.

Side note, I've got a friend that is an engineer at the Deere place in your neck of the woods.

Roy
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Jim
Posted 6/11/2007 22:58 (#161298 - in reply to #160874)
Subject: Re: sicle type mower vs discbine


Driftless SW Wisconsin

The uneven hillside pasture ground I was cutting had a lot of small dips and rises - most of which you could not really see under the heavy hay.  This is a pasture which had not had hay made in quite some time.  As a novice in the moco department, I just started along the fence and made circles around the field. This resulted in a lot of going up and down the hillside when I probably would have been better off trying to stay more on the contour, lifting and turning on the headlands as you would with a planter even though I'd end up driving over more of the end windrows.

The moco tires are a good 4 to 6 ft behind the cutterbar. With the undulations of the ground, when I came to a rise the cutterbar would cut much closer to the ground until the tires got to that spot.  Maybe there are some shoes under the cutterbar which could be adjusted which would have floated better but the double sicle did not look like it floated as on a flex platform at all.

I finally figured out I could not let the wheels down to the stops and ran it a couple inches higher. It did not plug there but also wasted a lot of  hay and left uneven stubble height.

One thing about trying something like a moco, it sure gives you an appreciation for the skills of the operators that I see in the field. A guy that can go around corners and keep a uniform width of cut and windrow size is a skilled person. We need to appreciate the skills that are required to run a farming operation.

Overall I agree that the discbine is probably much more efficient for most commercial operations if you have the acres and conditions for it.

Jim at Dawn



Edited by Jim 6/11/2007 22:59
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silagehauler
Posted 6/28/2011 14:50 (#1839444 - in reply to #161015)
Subject: Re: sycle type mower vs discbine



I agree. Although I have never messed with grinding knives. A few years ago, they cost 99 cents and had 2 sides. When I was running the swather, the knives on the outside turtlebacks usually got replaced every day, or day and half, maybe 2 days when all the stars and planets were right. The next set in could usually go a good 2 or 3 days. All the rest could 4 to 5 days usually.
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B Creech
Posted 6/28/2011 16:52 (#1839530 - in reply to #161298)
Subject: Re: sicle type mower vs discbine


E Central Ar
Jim - 6/11/2007 21:58

The uneven hillside pasture ground I was cutting had a lot of small dips and rises - most of which you could not really see under the heavy hay.  This is a pasture which had not had hay made in quite some time.  As a novice in the moco department, I just started along the fence and made circles around the field. This resulted in a lot of going up and down the hillside when I probably would have been better off trying to stay more on the contour, lifting and turning on the headlands as you would with a planter even though I'd end up driving over more of the end windrows.

The moco tires are a good 4 to 6 ft behind the cutterbar. With the undulations of the ground, when I came to a rise the cutterbar would cut much closer to the ground until the tires got to that spot.  Maybe there are some shoes under the cutterbar which could be adjusted which would have floated better but the double sicle did not look like it floated as on a flex platform at all.

I finally figured out I could not let the wheels down to the stops and ran it a couple inches higher. It did not plug there but also wasted a lot of  hay and left uneven stubble height.

One thing about trying something like a moco, it sure gives you an appreciation for the skills of the operators that I see in the field. A guy that can go around corners and keep a uniform width of cut and windrow size is a skilled person. We need to appreciate the skills that are required to run a farming operation.

Overall I agree that the discbine is probably much more efficient for most commercial operations if you have the acres and conditions for it.

Jim at Dawn



Jim
it sounds like the weight of the head was set to heavy and that will cause scalping on uneven ground
Here in southern Mo with our rocks and now the dang armadillos that have moved North I set my weight at no more than 25lbs and I prefer 18-20 that way the head will float over the object instead of cutting thru them
I cut a field yesterday that had terraces, several Diller holes and a few rocks that the cows turned over last winter
I only threw dirt 1 time on and that was on a big diller mound
You have to change the weight anytime you hook to a different tractor if the drawbar height is not identical
There is NO way I would go back with a sickle
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wbachur
Posted 7/13/2011 19:55 (#1861653 - in reply to #160685)
Subject: RE: sycle type mower vs discbine


2002 purchased a discbine DSX 161 case Ih, (16') what a machine, no comparison from sickle. Just sold it last month, out of cattle since 2006, looked and performed like it did the day we got it. What we liked about the machine was the different crops that could be cut. Native hay with a sickle bar is just as painful as using a swather, slow, blades tearing the grass instead of cutting, not fun, and slow. Green feed 6' tall no problem, The disc just slices through, just keep checking the blades for wear, switch around and your back cutting. The only maitainance i did was grease that machine and change out a few crop lifters, they wear over time, 3 of them in 4 years. Plus i spent 7hrs of cleaning it after each season, making it spotless, then greasing it after, you want to clean the dirt under there, from the heat the dirt stays on the sheetmetal and around the disc's. If memeroy serves those disc's spin about 180km/h or faster.

If you have lots of rocks on your land not the best, stay with a sickle.

The discbine uses more horse power, minimum 160hp for the 16'. I had 250hp case 4690, great tractor with the 4 wheel steer. i could cut at 10mph or faster, but kept it to 6mph

Sorry to see that machine go. if i ever get back into cattle, i will purchase another one, but selfpropelled.
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