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Great Plains Solid Stand Drill
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yellowgold
Posted 11/3/2008 12:42 (#496842)
Subject: Great Plains Solid Stand Drill


central texas
I have a great plains solid stand drill and i am trying to drill winter wheat into heavy corn residue. We are bone dry, this is tilled land for a little background have been over with a disk and field cultivator to smooth out. When i have the drill down it tries to act like a bulldozer and push dirt have adjsuted the drill up and down still cannot go. In two solid days i have drilled sixty acres with a 24 foot drill, not fun. I am constantly having to get off the tractor and clean and level out debris from in front. all bearings and disk seem to be in average condition. any tips. or suggestions. Wrong tool for the job?? do i have it set wrong ? I have some smaller clods and ample corn residue that seems to be the culprit. It seems that one corn stock feeding through wrong will create the bulldozer effect. can i remedy this

extremely frustrated, thanks
The gold is looking a little brown
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TheBonePile
Posted 11/3/2008 12:54 (#496847 - in reply to #496842)
Subject: RE: Great Plains Solid Stand Drill


Southeast South Dakota
well, i would say you shouldn't have disked it.....now the corn stalks are loose, not anchored down to anything

we used to have the same problem moldboard plowing......

incidentally, around here (SESD) people have planted oats for 50 years in disked corn stalks with just a standard drill ... if there is enough loose dirt available to get the wheat covered can u make this drill just like a regular drill?


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york
Posted 11/3/2008 13:20 (#496863 - in reply to #496842)
Subject: RE: Great Plains Solid Stand Drill


Berlin, Germany
yellowgold,

I just can say the same than the previous comment. Loosening will make it worth.
On the other hand wheat does not need tooo much so a chance you have in just spreading the wheat and use a heavy straw harrow to lightly incorporate the seed and to use a cambridge roller for soil to seed contact.
Wheat can take a lot.

York-Th.
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jc_ks
Posted 11/3/2008 13:42 (#496878 - in reply to #496842)
Subject: Re: Great Plains Solid Stand Drill


It sounds like it's not set right. It should plant into that. Make sure that the drill is level and not nosing in. If nothing else, call your dealer for setup help or read your operators manual
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yellowgold
Posted 11/3/2008 13:50 (#496880 - in reply to #496878)
Subject: Re: Great Plains Solid Stand Drill


central texas
Thanks, no manual. was planning on picking up tongue of drill to highest setting tonight, it seems the guard in front of the disk is causing the problem. It should make it a little higher if i adjust the tongue. will take some pictures tonight to explain better

Edited by yellowgold 11/3/2008 13:51
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zoom
Posted 11/3/2008 15:30 (#496919 - in reply to #496880)
Subject: Re: Great Plains Solid Stand Drill


central oklahoma
Adjust the pressure on the springs, you do that by adjusting the two outside gauge wheels down and the two carrier wheels in the center. I think that would help by not putting as much down pressure on the openers and let them ride over the material.
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unifarmor
Posted 11/3/2008 15:53 (#496931 - in reply to #496842)
Subject: Re: Great Plains Solid Stand Drill



Western Oregon
I have a GP 1500 with the cph cart which has the coulters quite a ways in front of the drill. I've planted into quite a bit of sweet corn stubble and worked fescue sod. I find that too much down pressure/depth on the coulters makes it bulldoze. My 1500 drill has enough downpressure to slice through a lot of residue without help from the front coulters.
I can put the drill in a float position buy releasing a catch on the cart. Then i raise the front coulters till they quit bulldozing. Just the weight of the 1500 drill by itself is enough to slice through most residue. I also have the great Plains 2-bar spring harrow which really helps to cover the seed in that type of situation. Harrow is made by Remlinger (sp?). Now I'm not sure how that would translate to your drill.
The other solution would be to go over the ground again with a heavy roller and pack it back down.
I planted into a sweet corn field last year where the farmer made two passes from corner to corner with a heavy covercrop disk before deciding to have me plant. Everytime I hit that loose dirt I would have to tilt the cart up or it would plug.
That's my $.02
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Paul(WI)
Posted 11/3/2008 17:15 (#496958 - in reply to #496842)
Subject: RE: Do you have it on float



Ours will bulldoze also but mainly if your using down pressure from the hydraulic lift. If on float the only time we have a problem is drilling on muck soil.
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yellowgold
Posted 11/3/2008 17:29 (#496961 - in reply to #496958)
Subject: Float?


central texas
How do i put it on float? dumb question i know, but educate me. I let the drill all the way down and the cylinder expand so it will flex, is that considered float
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tmrand
Posted 11/3/2008 19:50 (#497030 - in reply to #496842)
Subject: Re: Great Plains Solid Stand Drill



Colorado
I agree that you should have drilled before disking. It would have worked great but now that you're where you are at I would definately take the down pressure off the disks and let them float over the trash. Hopefully you have irrigation or rainfall to help bring the wheat up. You might plant a little thicker than the desired stand using this method.
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Paul(WI)
Posted 11/3/2008 20:18 (#497055 - in reply to #496961)
Subject: RE: Float?



Ours is an GP end wheel drill, so maybe were not talking the same thing?? But on ours where the hyd. cylinder attaches, you remove a pin to apply some down pressure or let it float.
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ks8780
Posted 11/3/2008 21:10 (#497111 - in reply to #496842)
Subject: Re: Great Plains Solid Stand Drill



Jewell County KS
http://www.greatplainsmfg.com/

You can find a copy of your drill manual here. might be of some help.
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bushton4
Posted 11/3/2008 21:46 (#497158 - in reply to #496842)
Subject: Re: Great Plains Solid Stand Drill



if this is a 2SF24 GP solid stand drill, you wouldn't have made it thru the corn stalks if they were over 100bu. Hair pinning would have been the problem. That particular drill does not weigh enough to go play in heavy corn stover. Will be a 24' buck rake, especially if they are Bt corn stalks.
How worn out are the double disks? Orginally they are 13.5" and I consider them shot at 12.25-12.5" depending on the residue you are running in. If they are worn, they will not go thru the residue very well. Sound to me like the thing is running "nose down", are the boxes level when you are in running in the field?
If the residue is bunching up in front of the openers, your best bet is to find you a turbo till or like tool to size up the residue into smaller pieces to let it flow thru the machine. Are they Bt corn stalks? Did your disk cut them or just crease them and leave them in 2-3' pieces with dents from the disc blades. Discing again will probably not cure the issue if they are long pieces, nothing solid for the disc blades to cut against. Post some pix if you can.

here is the 2sf24-30 manual link
http://www.greatplainsmfg.com/manuals/mintillmanuals.html


Edited by bushton4 11/3/2008 21:47
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Jim
Posted 11/4/2008 04:55 (#497344 - in reply to #496842)
Subject: RE: Great Plains Solid Stand Drill


Driftless SW Wisconsin
I believe there is an hydraulic pressure adjustment valve on the front of the frame probably on th LH side of the frame somwewhere. turn the knob all the way counter clockwise and this should lighten the drill row units so they don't push so much. This is really a "no till" drill but will work if you lighten the down pressure on the coulters like this. You can also raise the tow point at the hitch and run it a bit "nose up" in dry disked ground like that - it helps. I have occasionally rented one of these to plant wheat or pastures. Good luck. Jim at Dawn

Edited by Jim 11/4/2008 04:59
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jc_ks
Posted 11/4/2008 07:23 (#497380 - in reply to #496842)
Subject: Re: Great Plains Solid Stand Drill


What is the model of your GP drill? They have several different models, each one different on setup and use.
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yellowgold
Posted 11/4/2008 08:16 (#497422 - in reply to #497380)
Subject: Re: Great Plains Solid Stand Drill


central texas
http://www.tractorhouse.com/listings/detail.aspx?OHID=5331591&GUID=...

My drill is like this one. Finally got finished with that field last night, moved into a new field this morning worked perfect probably got as much done in the new field last night as i did all day sunday i quess a little less cursing and a little more praying gets the job done everytime have to get going chance of rain tomorrow and 80 ac. to finish up thanks for all the help

PS tipped the hitch up one more notch seem to be the best remedy to much loose dirt and trash is the culprit. Will take some pictures this evening hopefully of the last round or two
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crowbar
Posted 11/4/2008 08:27 (#497435 - in reply to #497422)
Subject: Re: Remove Half the Opener Springs?


Hazelton, Kansas

Yellowgold:

I had a drill just like that...I think it was an '88 model.

To control depth and allow the disks to move over residue clumps, I removed one of the two springs on each opener, except for the openers that ran behind either a drill wheel or a tractor wheel.

This pretty much solved the problem, and I ran it that way for 15 years or so. Sold it to a neighbor, who still runs it that way.

I only did a limited amount of notill at the time (into bean stubble), and the single spring was a little marginal for that. However, the openers on that drill aren't really built for notill, anyway.

MDS

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jc_ks
Posted 11/4/2008 10:28 (#497552 - in reply to #497422)
Subject: Re: Great Plains Solid Stand Drill


Tongue and the box frame should be level. Openers should be run level as well. Opener spring pressure should be in the lowest setting in less you need more
spring pressure behind tractor tire tracks. Go to the GP website and download an operators manual for more help.

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