AgTalk Home
AgTalk Home
Search Forums | Classifieds (54) | Skins | Language
You are logged in as a guest. ( logon | register )

How has wheat changed over the last 50 years ?
View previous thread :: View next thread
   Forums List -> Crop TalkMessage format
 
Mike SE IL
Posted 9/16/2012 09:02 (#2593538)
Subject: How has wheat changed over the last 50 years ?



Quick background:  A couple friends have been diagnosed gluten intolerant.  This has lead to several discussions and the question has been raised: How has wheat changed in the last 50-100 years?

In an article "Just how beneficial is a gluten-free diet for those without celiac disease?" I find this quote: "According to naturopath Glen Depke, it appears that the old wheat was three percent gluten, and now it is 50 percent.

Let's not argue over "natural" or "organic" and not dismiss someone's thoughts just because they advocate such. They may misunderstand some things but still have good ideas and questions.  I responded to a friend's quote of this article to tell her he was incorrect in one area, very little hybrid wheat is available and quoted a Healthy Home Economist article saying "Hybrid Wheat NOT the Same as GM Wheat"

When asked "How has wheat changed?"   I responded "To be honest I haven't a clue. I look at things like yield, standability, disease resistance, etc. I don't get paid to worry about things like gluten content, so it never enters my mind."

My friend Dr Betsy replied "Too many people's health improve when they remove wheat and other grains from the diet. Gotta work on why."

So how would you respond when asked how wheat has changed?

Top of the page Bottom of the page
iseedit
Posted 9/16/2012 09:09 (#2593553 - in reply to #2593538)
Subject: RE: How has wheat changed over the last 50 years ?



central - east central Minnesota -

There's a Dr promoting a "his" new book that basiclly says the same thing - Wheat has been bred to have more gluten and other UNHEALTHY genes, from wheats that were available 50-100 yrs ago . . .
He was interesting, talking about which genes / protiens the wheat has, that cause medical problems in people, but, he was promoting his book also . . . .
The book is called "Wheat Belly" . . . .by William Davis MD
Agian, if some of what he claims is true, then yes, wheat has changed .. . . .
But, was it changed for the betterment of human life and now it's gone too far ? ??



Edited by iseedit 9/16/2012 09:11
Top of the page Bottom of the page
John 86
Posted 9/16/2012 12:05 (#2593868 - in reply to #2593553)
Subject: RE: How has wheat changed over the last 50 years ?


Seaforth, Ontario

After a discussion with an 'organic' follower who asked me if 'Wheat Belly' was factual, I went to local library to get a copy; I'm number 19 on the waiting list for the book. I can get the audio version after 10 others. So, there is a lot of interest stirred by this book, or people are just looking for the miracle diet.
Cutting gluten from one's diet would benefit most people if they substitue fruits and vegetables for some of the refined grain products. It would be like eating oatmeal instead of 2 eggs for breakfast; the eggs may not be the problem, but the substitue (oatmeal fibre) reduces cholesterol levels, so people blame eggs for heart attacks.

Top of the page Bottom of the page
Ed Winkle
Posted 9/16/2012 20:51 (#2594590 - in reply to #2593868)
Subject: The gluten claim and Wheat Belly Blog


Martinsville, Ohio

I would question the 3 vs 50% gluten claim also.  Does anyone have good data?  I can get it but I don't have it handy.  Dr. Hal LaFevre and I talked about this 20 years ago but I don't recall the numbers.

I am glad you brought this up, Mike.  LuAnn did last week and I blogged on Wheat Belly.  My reading refuted Davis' claim that hybridization is at fault because we all know HyBrex and other hybridization attempts failed because wheat is a "perfect self pollinating plant."

We have bred for shorter wheats that stand higher N and end up with less nutrient dense food and more carbohydrate.  Then the food industry discovered how to market food with "cheap wheat" and 75% of what is on grocery shelves has wheat and or corn in it.

The gluten question is a good one and I would like to know the answer.

http://www.hymark.blogspot.com/2012/09/wheat-belly.html

Ed

Top of the page Bottom of the page
coolhand
Posted 9/16/2012 09:27 (#2593590 - in reply to #2593538)
Subject: RE: How has wheat changed over the last 50 years ?



I'm not sure what the gluten content is of the parents of modern wheat, three percent seems low though. Fifty percent for today's wheat is absurd. Flour has to be refined to get it to that level. Hard and spring wheats are going to run maybe 13-15% gluten and soft wheats maybe 7-9%.

How has wheat changed? Over the last 3000 years its been selected to make bread. The higher gluten helps elasticize the dough so CO2 made by yeast can stay trapped in the dough, the dough rises and we get light, fluffy bread instead of a brick. In the last fifty years varieties have been bred so that wheat can be grown from the equator to damn near the arctic circle and still yield decently. That was a lot of the work of Norman Borloug during the Green Revolution.

I guess breeders could select for varieties that have less gluten, millers and bakers would go nuts though. There would need to be another grade for it.
Top of the page Bottom of the page
Wheatguy
Posted 9/16/2012 09:44 (#2593626 - in reply to #2593538)
Subject: RE: How has wheat changed over the last 50 years ?



Sumner County Kansas "The Wheat Capital"

Wheat has changed over the years but for the better. There have been many studies done over the years and there is NO scientific proof that a gluten free diet is healthier than a well balanced diet including wheat products. Gluten is sometimes added either at the mill or the bakery to enhance the baking quality of some flour for some products. Many people will try to blame their own shortcomings whether it be overweight or poor health on someone or something instead of where the true blame belongs, the person holding the FORK. You can find some very helpfull and honest information here. http://www.wheatfoods.org/



Edited by Wheatguy 9/16/2012 09:56
Top of the page Bottom of the page
okpanhandle
Posted 9/16/2012 09:59 (#2593653 - in reply to #2593538)
Subject: Re: How has wheat changed over the last 50 years ?



Guymon, OK
To make a broad generalization, our modern wheat varieties are shorter, somewhat higher yielding, are better able to shrug off disease and stress, and have better milling and baking qualities. Aside from selecting for these useful traits, there isn't a lot of difference between modern wheat and the varieties our grandparents planted. Wheat is wheat. I'm not terribly sure about the chemical composition of wheat, but I'm fairly certain that the 50% gluten claim is bunk. Remember, humans have been cultivating wheat for thousands of years, and selecting for the same traits our modern breeders look for.

There is no scientifically proven reason to cut wheat and other cereal grains out of a person's diet except to deal with celiac disease (which affects about 1% of the US population). Any rise in the occurrence of celiac disease is the result of better diagnostic methods and public awareness of the disease, not wheat somehow becoming dangerous to humans. The people making money off of this trend are charlatans who are playing off the fears of the uneducated for their personal gain.
Top of the page Bottom of the page
Dave75
Posted 9/16/2012 14:31 (#2594031 - in reply to #2593653)
Subject: Re: How has wheat changed over the last 50 years ?



Rural Valley pa
Wheat came from spelt's right. I read some article that there are only two plants that will de hull spelt's in the US. And that they are much better for you than wheat but cost to much for the extra processing.
Top of the page Bottom of the page
runningbehind
Posted 9/16/2012 14:58 (#2594066 - in reply to #2593538)
Subject: Re: How has wheat changed over the last 50 years ?



webster, north dakota
I just read the Wheat Belly book not long back, if I can remember correctly wheat is one of the few things that when being bred for other purposes the number of genes increases. Instead of changing, they just add on the top. Davis claims that wheat is now "Super" wheat compared to what our ancestors had. Alot of the book follows along with the "Healthy for Life" theory's also.
Top of the page Bottom of the page
snsw no till
Posted 9/16/2012 15:10 (#2594081 - in reply to #2594066)
Subject: Re: How has wheat changed over the last 50 years ?


far sNSW , Australia
I'm a wheat farmer. Too much wheat for breakfast really upsets my stomach. So its oat porridge. A balanced diet helps me alot. We grind our own flour and make own bread so we know no residual chemicals in our bread.
Top of the page Bottom of the page
martin
Posted 9/17/2012 00:32 (#2595096 - in reply to #2594066)
Subject: Re: How has wheat changed over the last 50 years ?


I'd really like to hear someone speak to this, who has a strong background in genetics.  It seems to me that if you increase the number of genes, you will no longer have "wheat".  I would question whether this author's - Davis - statement is/  can be accurate. 

Anyone with a genetics background care to expound on this???

Top of the page Bottom of the page
milofarmer1
Posted 9/16/2012 15:10 (#2594083 - in reply to #2593538)
Subject: Re: How has wheat changed over the last 50 years ?



Farwell, TX/Pleasant Hill, NM
It takes 10-15 years to breed a different variety of wheat. Going from 3% to 50% gluten would take centuries, besides the fact it would probably be impossible. I don't know what they are smoking, maybe some of that supposed GENETICALLY MODIFIED wheat they made up.

This gluten free deal is the fad thing right now. Not to minimize actual intolerance I know exists, but it seems parents need something to blame their fat kid on. Forget about the TV, iPad, iPhone, iMac, convenience foods, soda pop, delivering their fat rear to school every day, when they live 3 blocks from school.

This too shall pass. Next it will be something else that is ruining our health. I just wish I could write some books about it and get everybody whipped up about it and make a bunch of money.
Top of the page Bottom of the page
StarviewFarm
Posted 9/16/2012 15:58 (#2594152 - in reply to #2594083)
Subject: Re: How has wheat changed over the last 50 years ?



Idaho

Its funny your two foods cited for causing overweight kids are both grain based foods.  In reality a grain based diet has only been around for the last 100 years out of 10,000 making it look like the real fad.

Top of the page Bottom of the page
KF Farm
Posted 9/16/2012 16:30 (#2594180 - in reply to #2594152)
Subject: Re: How has wheat changed over the last 50 years ?


I would like all of you to spend a week with my autistic son on his gluten free diet to get used to his personality. Then you can give him whatever gluten source you want and if you really believe what you say you better give him a lot. You will feel ashamed and embarrassed of you ignorance and pride. I did.

He has been gluten free since January 4th. At 6 years old, he could only read 10 words before he was gluten free. After 10 days on the diet he read 100 words. After 9 months he reads books.

By the way 1 out of 60 boys are autistic. That was 1 out of 100 2-3 years ago. So I don't think this is just a fad. Also, you can throw in all the ADHD and ADD because they can be controlled by gluten too.

Oh and when my wife daughter and I went gluten free to support my son, I lost 15 pounds in 2-3 weeks. And I replaced some of the gluten products with tortilla chips. So I don't think that is a great healthy choice like fruit or vegetables to provide that point of view.

The worst thing about wheat is that it is in everything. Try being on the road for a week and see if you can avoid it.

By the way, I have fond memories of wheat. The first field I ever combined was wheat and my father still raises wheat, so I am not a total anti wheat hippie type etc.
Top of the page Bottom of the page
Mark in WCIowa
Posted 7/21/2013 14:05 (#3220837 - in reply to #2594180)
Subject: Re: How has wheat changed over the last 50 years ?


Then why doesnt it show up in studies?


We also have an autistic child...relatively severe. We did the gluten free for close to half a year and saw zero difference. Of course she eats very little gluten anyway. She thrives on fruits and vegetables. Perhaps each child is different. I have a neice that has celiac disease and has to avoid gluten.
Top of the page Bottom of the page
milofarmer1
Posted 9/16/2012 16:54 (#2594214 - in reply to #2594152)
Subject: Re: How has wheat changed over the last 50 years ?



Farwell, TX/Pleasant Hill, NM
douglas8017 - 9/16/2012 14:58

Its funny your two foods cited for causing overweight kids are both grain based foods.  In reality a grain based diet has only been around for the last 100 years out of 10,000 making it look like the real fad.


I'm not sure what you mean by "grain based" diet, but grains have been the foundation of food all of civilized humanity.

From Genesis 3:

17To Adam he said, “Because you listened to your wife and ate from the tree about which I commanded you, ‘You must not eat of it,’

“Cursed is the ground because of you;
through painful toil you will eat of it
all the days of your life.
18It will produce thorns and thistles for you,
and you will eat the plants of the field.
19By the sweat of your brow
you will eat your food
until you return to the ground,
since from it you were taken;
for dust you are
and to dust you will return.”
Top of the page Bottom of the page
StarviewFarm
Posted 9/16/2012 18:56 (#2594378 - in reply to #2594214)
Subject: Re: How has wheat changed over the last 50 years ?



Idaho

I didn't say grain never was eaten in the past, it just wasn't the main dish it is today. Pretty sure meat was the foundation of diets ask the plains Indians.  Also in biblical times and before, most grains were soaked or sprouted before being ground which changes the properties of the grain.   

Top of the page Bottom of the page
zkeele
Posted 9/16/2012 23:19 (#2594990 - in reply to #2594378)
Subject: Re: How has wheat changed over the last 50 years ?


Tennessee
I think diet varied greatly based on man's environment. Plains Indians lived on mostly meat, but the Pueblo Indians grew grain. Also, it is obvious that the first man's diet was grain based.

I understand your point though. Everything we eat is processed grain. Prepackaged snacks, hamburger buns, bread, tortilla chips, Cokes, you name it.
Top of the page Bottom of the page
tmgsssn
Posted 9/16/2012 17:54 (#2594281 - in reply to #2594152)
Subject: Re: How has wheat changed over the last 50 years ?



Vernon,TX
douglas8017 - 9/16/2012 14:58

Its funny your two foods cited for causing overweight kids are both grain based foods.  In reality a grain based diet has only been around for the last 100 years out of 10,000 making it look like the real fad.



What "reality" are you living in? What do you think people ate? Grain is one of the major reason people could build permanent residences. They were able to grow and store massive amounts of food so they didn't have to follow the seasons around. Even when they were nomadic they would gather fruit and grain to eat. Grain has been a major source in human food forever.

Top of the page Bottom of the page
StarviewFarm
Posted 9/16/2012 19:06 (#2594395 - in reply to #2594281)
Subject: Re: How has wheat changed over the last 50 years ?



Idaho

Meat.  People ate meat mainly.  If you were a nomad, would you rather hunt a deer and have feed for a month.  Or spend a month gathering enough grain for a day.  I can't believe the eskimos gathered much grain, in fact all indigenous people lived on meat.  Storing grain started when the government decided it wanted to get in the food control business and started subsidizing commodities.

Top of the page Bottom of the page
milofarmer1
Posted 9/16/2012 21:25 (#2594684 - in reply to #2594395)
Subject: Re: How has wheat changed over the last 50 years ?



Farwell, TX/Pleasant Hill, NM
I don't know that it is worth arguing about, but you are using a very select minority (Plains Indians and Eskimos) to support your claim of grain based diets being a modern phenomenon. It just isn't true for the huge majority of the civilized world. You can look back at ration records from our countries early years and they had very ample amounts of grain and flour in their diets. Along with meats.

Even the Pueblo peoples of the SW were mostly grain farmers, at least until the rains quit.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ancient_Pueblo_Peoples
Top of the page Bottom of the page
aray63
Posted 9/18/2012 16:15 (#2597654 - in reply to #2594083)
Subject: Re: How has wheat changed over the last 50 years ?


barry county mi
We were in Germany for last couple weeks visiting with daughter and her family so done a lot runing around from gymastics to dance class for little kids only remember seeing one fat little boy and in Wiesbauen spelled wrong say a couple older cripled ladies that were over weight. but very few obese people over in the area we were running around in. They do not sell soda pop with corn syrup in it they ride alot on bicyles and walk alot and most of the people smoke which I was really suprised. people were thin like back in the hills in the 1950s. ps Id say they drink a lot of wine Id guess, nice people thanks archie
Top of the page Bottom of the page
Chimel
Posted 9/16/2012 18:10 (#2594295 - in reply to #2593538)
Subject: Re: How has wheat changed over the last 50 years ?


Several chapters of Wheat Belly are available online on Google Books if you want to check, but the author did not conduct his test studies by comparing between the new wheat varieties and the ones available 50 years ago, many of which are still available if he had cared, but with different grain such as emmer (farro,) so it just does not look relevant or scientific (he performed the so-called studies on himself, by eating 100g of wheat in the morning and being near vomiting for the next 36 hours.)

I'll call the 3%-50% gluten claim total ruminant manure. The best soft wheat varieties used for bread typically reach 14-15% protein. Maybe they meant the percentage of gluten within the total protein content. Einkorn varieties have been developed to contain 13-22% of proteins, with 0-50% gluten (http://www.growseed.org/Kovac.pdf) although I think in wheat most of the protein is gluten, so that percentage would be higher. Emmer has 22-24% protein, which is much higher than wheat, but supposedly has less gluten. The wild emmer similar to the one harvested over 10,000 years ago has about the same protein content, some even reaching 30% protein.

There was an explosion of wheat varieties in the 80s, and many more since, but the selection process is different across countries, and yet the celiac disease prevalence seems to be similar in the United States and Europe, so I wonder if wheat is really causing it, or if it's not just one facet of the general increase in allergies and autoimmune diseases. It should be easy to check, there must still be some of these old wheat varieties in our seed banks, or some traditional varieties that are still being cultivated unchanged. I am pretty confident though that persons suffering from celiac disease will not support these old varieties either, as symptoms appear even with different types of grain that have low gluten but still contain some.

At least, from all I read about, wheat has not been genetically engineered (yet), all selection like the introduction of the dwarf gene has been performed through cross-pollinating, not test tubes. Still, all this breeding was mostly intended to increase yield and resistance to pests, not for the benefit of human health, so it would be interesting to see a scientific comparison between the old and new varieties and their impact on human health.
Top of the page Bottom of the page
Pat H
Posted 9/16/2012 22:06 (#2594800 - in reply to #2594295)
Subject: Re: How has wheat changed over the last 50 years ?



Cropsey, IL
So far we live longer and complain more. Of course, that's not my fault, it has to be the wheat or pork or lack of an organic label.

I don't mean to sound cruel, but we've had kids of varying levels of ability forever and the best medicine was always to not feel sorry for them and just be good parents. I'm sure there were lots of kids in the past that we would diagnose as special needs that ended up running big companies. As I remember ol' henry ford or even Einstein were not considered the sharpest tools in the shed. We need to stop being 'devasted', get over ourselves and do the job we are called to. If diet makes our job easier, it's a blessing. It isn't a reason to right a book.
Top of the page Bottom of the page
martin
Posted 9/17/2012 00:42 (#2595103 - in reply to #2593538)
Subject: RE: How has wheat changed over the last 50 years ?


I would raise the question:  Has wheat changed? or has the processing of wheat changed (more) ?  I would guess that the processing of wheat has changed more in the last 50 years, than the wheat itself.

Myself ? I started using more whole wheat to do my baking etc.  I have noticed - personally - that using whole wheat where I can, I don't get that "crash effect" in my blood sugars.  It used to be that if I ate something I made with regular wheat flour for lunch, within 20 minutes or so, I would need to take a nap.  I don't get that effect, or not so much, when using whole wheat flour. 

Do you think I am on the right track, or do you believe this is all "in my head"?

Top of the page Bottom of the page
KF Farm
Posted 9/17/2012 06:21 (#2595171 - in reply to #2595103)
Subject: Re: How has wheat changed over the last 50 years ?


Right track
Top of the page Bottom of the page
jbgruver
Posted 9/17/2012 06:37 (#2595180 - in reply to #2595103)
Subject: RE: How has wheat changed over the last 50 years ?



Martin, I think you are on the right track with your interpretation that processing has changed grain based food products more than breeding.

that said, the U of IL's new P and K removal rates for grain show a significant drop relative to the last time that they did a large scale analysis of nutrient content in grain.

breeding for high yield seems to be having some significant effects on the chemical composition of grain.

Joel
WIU Agriculture

Top of the page Bottom of the page
martin
Posted 9/17/2012 08:26 (#2595311 - in reply to #2595180)
Subject: RE: How has wheat changed over the last 50 years ?


Does anyone have a seed bank of older varieties of wheat - varieties from 50+ years ago? 

If so, maybe it would be possible to get some of these seeds, and grow some to get enough to do a research project on this. 

I am sure someone could find out how wheat was processed 50 years ago. 

And then someone could do a research project comparing the nutrient content of both the grains as harvested, and the grains post-processing, 50 years ago vs today.  

NOT that I am going to do this..........   just saying it would be a good way to look at it.   

Top of the page Bottom of the page
runningbehind
Posted 9/17/2012 08:38 (#2595327 - in reply to #2595311)
Subject: RE: How has wheat changed over the last 50 years ?



webster, north dakota
if you look online you can find emmer wheat for sale, as mentioned in the book and I agree the processing is also an issue. 50 years ago would have been the start of wonderbread roughly. If high sugar white bread has any resemblence to what has been eaten for 1000's of years, I would like to hear it.

I have a SIL that apparently has a gluten allergy, can eat small amounts but not of anything highly processed. Also has to eat the "sprouted" bread to avoid trouble. Man if that stuff isn't like eating a rock. In the end all of these theory's come back to telling you to eat unprocessed food as much as possible and eat in moderation.

I have met a couple of people that cutting back gluten was really good for them. I don't seem to have any issues with it, but feel that moderation isn't a bad idea. After reading the book I was wondering if there isn't a bit of a niche market to raise some of the heritage wheats, nothing wrong with supplying it for someone who wants it. For a premium of course......
Top of the page Bottom of the page
tr70
Posted 9/17/2012 10:52 (#2595519 - in reply to #2593538)
Subject: RE: How has wheat changed over the last 50 years ?


I was talking with my wife about this just last night. I farm - use chem - and gmo - was an agronomist for 10 years - love chemicals. Really nice to spray a field and have it spotless. Would I change my way of production to do things more "naturally" -- sure if I got paid for it. The western economic model - for all the good its done for mankind - is based on getting the lowest cost / highest quality product - this means we must have some efficiancy of scale - bring in modern american ag, and food processors. I think most farmers would willingly go away from some current practices if they had a reward for doing it ($ to justify time and labor) What is the scariest is how little we know about the long term effects of some of the things we're doing - I think that we'd all agree cancer rates are up --- but then again we're all living longer - and a higher percentage make it to reproductive age - giving us a weaker genetic makeup as a whole. If I was at home all the time I would have a large garden and grow most of our produce and have our own food source -- why - because I know where it comes from -- dont have to worry about some big company throwing junk in there to "cheapen the ration" . But I don't have time to do this -- and I dont really want to spent the extra money- and I like a McDonalds burger occasionally - processed foods taste great - my wife cant make doritos. I think its something more people should look at -- total analisis of our food we eat -- an then the agrument begins - just because two things are chemically the same in the lab are they the same? What things do we not know about and how are the affecting us -- dont know. Dont know that we'll ever get an answer either -- what company is going to come out and say "we made an extra $.10 per loaf of bread by using this additive thats bad for you - its gonna make us higher priced or we'll lose profit but we're gonna take it out" -- now a hometown baker might choose to do that -- but not hostess or sara lee. Even if Monsanto had proof that GMO's were hurting people I dont know that we'd ever find out - they'd wait to have somebody else proove it then get sued and get out of it in bankrupcy -- to much money involved - too many people. I'm not saying I feel that gmo's are bad just using the example. I dont mean to make this political - but I think its at the heart of the issue - and I think both political parties are too involved on both sides of the issue to really care. One of those cases where its tough to get a neutral third party who'll shoot straight.
Top of the page Bottom of the page
deerefarm
Posted 9/17/2012 11:01 (#2595532 - in reply to #2593538)
Subject: Re: How has wheat changed over the last 50 years ?


North Central North Dakota
Everything in moderation......especially half truth books written by self serving people.
Top of the page Bottom of the page
martin
Posted 9/17/2012 19:21 (#2596081 - in reply to #2595532)
Subject: Now, there's a quote to remember. N/T


.

Top of the page Bottom of the page
mennoboy
Posted 9/17/2012 14:44 (#2595778 - in reply to #2593538)
Subject: RE: How has wheat changed over the last 50 years ?


Rivers, MB
This discussion came up a few days ago. My brother had read something similiar to what you are asking about. One reply that my brother had read/heard was that over the last 50 years as wheat as been bred for higher yield, the yield increase has come mainly in the size of the kernels. Because the gluten comes from the center of the kernel, the % of gluten has increased because the ratio of outside layer of wheat to center of kernel has changed.

I don't know if its true but could make some sense. However, it would not explain the % increase in gluten like a few other posters have commented on.

Anyone remember the size of wheat kernels from 50 years ago? Were they significantly smaller than now?
Top of the page Bottom of the page
pmartens07
Posted 9/17/2012 21:52 (#2596430 - in reply to #2593538)
Subject: Re: How has wheat changed over the last 50 years ?


Penn Yan, NY
We learned in school that Norman Borlaug started the Green revolution in part by developing a modern Dwarf wheat that adapted well to heavier fertilization. According to wikipedia that wheat was called Norin 10 and was actually a Japanese wheat found by a biologist working with MacArthur after WWII.

To go back to what zkeele said earlier, what we ate was based on our environment. That would mean that different cultures developed with the specific food they produced, and were best able to digest them.

Therefore I would propose that the presence of East Asian genetics in our modern wheats may be a factor in the digestibility to Europeans. I have read about patterns in lactose intolerance based on historic diets of a culture, could it be the same with wheat?

Another question I would have comes back to another breakthrough Borlaug made in rust resistance. Is it possible that some of the same genes that provided rust protection also had a low level antagonistic effect on some peoples intestinal tracts? These effects could have become more pronounced as flour became more and more refined, or at least mediating effects of the whole grain could have been lost.

For the record, I am an organic farmer growing wheat, spelt, emmer, and einkorn and certainly profit from the "gluten free" craze, but when asked why its better I try to have a rational response that is fact and reason based and leaves the decision to the consumer.

Just some points to think on. . .
Top of the page Bottom of the page
Jump to forum :
Search this forum
Printer friendly version
E-mail a link to this thread

(Delete all cookies set by this site)