AgTalk Home
AgTalk Home
Search Forums | Classifieds (14) | Skins | Language
You are logged in as a guest. ( logon | register )

History lesson needed - Fox and Field Queen choppers
View previous thread :: View next thread
   Forums List -> Machinery TalkMessage format
 
bgunzy
Posted 11/25/2009 19:36 (#938270)
Subject: History lesson needed - Fox and Field Queen choppers



Humeston, IA

While checking out Tractor House I came across some Fox and Field Queen choppers. 

Questions - What happened to Fox?  Did someone buy them out or did they fade away?  I know Field Queen was marketed through Hesston, but were they actually a Hesston owned brand or a separate entity?  What were the pluses and minuses of these rigs?  Probably were some of the first self propelled choppers (other than New Idea and MM Uni's), right?.  Thanks!

Top of the page Bottom of the page
baler brian
Posted 11/25/2009 20:24 (#938349 - in reply to #938270)
Subject: RE: History lesson needed - Fox and Field Queen choppers



Fox was headquartered in Appleton WI. They had one of the best forage choppers in the late 60's early 70's They actually made one of the first facers for removing forage from bunker silos. They were a little ahead of their time on that one. I think they were bought up by Brady and also Koehring. I toured the plant for a 4-H trip in the late 70's. The plant is long closed. There is a guy in WI that has a whole display of alot of the Fox memorobelia including a working self propelled chopper. I can not remember his name but I saw him this summer. Fox made alot more things than most people realized and were quite popular in this area.
Top of the page Bottom of the page
jumpinfarmer
Posted 11/25/2009 22:05 (#938533 - in reply to #938349)
Subject: RE: History lesson needed - Fox and Field Queen choppers


western NY
I think they were first bought out by Koehring in the 70's and Koehring also owned Brady and that is where Fox Brady came from. Then in the 80's Koehring sold them off to Hinniker which continued to build Fox choppers for a while. The last new ones I can remember seeing were in the late 80's I'd guess 88 to 1990 would be the last ones made. Our neighbor has a late one that they use and if I remember right they bought it in 1986. At the time it was quite a bit more expensive than a New Holland or Deere but is built a whole lot hevier.

When I was a kid there was a good Fox dealer neer here and they sold a boat load of Fox stuff not just choppers. In our neighborhood there was over dozen Fox choppers some still running, and we are only maybe 20 miles from the Papec factory which was still building choppers then too. I know the market for pull type choppers has dried up but it realy is a shame that Fox didn't survive since they realy were the top of the line machine.
Top of the page Bottom of the page
Dvr
Posted 11/25/2009 22:53 (#938608 - in reply to #938533)
Subject: RE: History lesson needed - Fox and Field Queen choppers


Pipestone MN
Tell me about the Papec brand. I haven't heard of them since the early '60's.
Top of the page Bottom of the page
jumpinfarmer
Posted 11/26/2009 08:23 (#938905 - in reply to #938608)
Subject: RE: History lesson needed - Fox and Field Queen choppers


western NY
Sorry about hijacking the Fox thread.

PAPEC Stands for Power-And-Pnumatic-Ensilage-Cutter I have also heard Propeller and Pnumatic not sure what is right. They started into business around 1900 in my hometown of Lima NY. At that time silos were just becomming popular and so was dairying here in western NY. They remained in Lima for about ten years until there was a fire that destroyed the factory, which from the pictures I've seen and knowing where it sat couldn't have been too big. While they had become very popular there future in Lima was doomed even before the fire since Lima had no railroad except a very small private rail line that ran to neerby Honeoye Falls. (Any railroad buffs might want to check this out since I believe it was a one of a kind thing) After the fire PAPEC bought the former Empire grin dill factory in Shortsville NY about 20 miles east of here, they would remain there untill there demise in the late 70's or very early 80's. That factory burned in the late 80's.

They specialized in forage equipment and at first only built ensilage cutters but then added hammer mills. Around WWII they came out with a field harvester and after the war they became very popular in this area. At that time there was enough dairy farms in our area alone to keep then in business. The first harvesters were the 151 and the 181 both had one row heads and could be equiped with a pick up. The 151 could either be PTO or driven with a LeRoy engine, the 181 only came with the engine. Durring the 50's they came out with a rather large line of forage equipment including hammer mills, grinder mixers, 3 differant size forage harvesters with various heads, flail choppers, self unloading wagons, blowers both lone and short hopper, sprayers, and even a grain and hay dryer. Durring the 60's they remained popular especially there self unloading wagons which there are still a few around, I believe there clain to fame was a continus apron drive at a time when others were using a ratchet drive. The rest of there line became more modern apperring but realy was the same equipment being made in the 50's just spruced up a little. As the 70's started the same thing happened, same old machines just a differant paint job. An example is the No. 35 chopper of the 50's became the 350 in the 60's and the 3500 in the 70's, all of them still had some parts that were common going back all the way the the first stationary cutters built at the turn of the century. Somewhere I have a beutifull full color brocure for a 3500 chopper from the mid 70's. While it has a modern apperance with 11x15 tires a nice jack and even electric spout controles it was very dated. I think it was the last flywheel chopper, I don't think they ever made a cutter head machine. By the late 70's there sales shrank to almost nothing because of there dated line, wagons were still popular but everything else was 20's behind the competition and around 1980 they closed up shop. For a while a place somewhere in Tennesee was making and selling parts but I'm sure that has ended by now, making PAPEC only a fond memory in the farming comunity.
Top of the page Bottom of the page
TWB
Posted 11/26/2009 08:59 (#938951 - in reply to #938905)
Subject: RE: History lesson needed - Fox and Field Queen choppers


I think that would of been in Shelbilby(sp) Tenn. I think. I know they have a lot of Papec equipment on their lot, I thought they were a distributer for the equipment. Eskew Implement in the Lebanon area of Tennessee was a Papec dealer, sold alot of cutters, blowers, and wagons. Nearly every dairy farm had a couple of Papec wagons. Eskew Implement was also a Allis-Chalmers dealer and during the Deutz-Allis era was a Massey Ferguson dealer till he close up in the mid eighties. The late eighties was a tough time on the alot of old AC and MF dealers, as well as IH and Ford dealers.
Top of the page Bottom of the page
ny bill
Posted 11/26/2009 07:50 (#938873 - in reply to #938349)
Subject: RE: History lesson needed - Fox and Field Queen choppers


i saw the fox exhibit at the wisconsin farm show. very interesting. i have a 1961 fox SPF (self propelled forage?) chopper that needs restoring, and a mid 80s fox 6250 self propelled that we still use. they were well built and simple/ workable in design. dad had a fox self unloading wagon, one of the first su wagons built.
Top of the page Bottom of the page
dairyman78
Posted 11/25/2009 20:27 (#938355 - in reply to #938270)
Subject: RE: History lesson needed - Fox and Field Queen choppers


S.C. Wisconsin
Don't know much about Field Queen but I remember Fox. At one time if you had a good chopper you had a Fox. They were built extremely heavy in fact at one time they were overbuilt. I wish they would build machinery like that now. But some time in the early 80's (I guessing) they got bought out by Khoering. Everything went downhill from there on. Typical of a bean counter company. Built them cheaper and never kept up to the times when HP of the tractors were increasing. It was a shame that these companies get bought out by these companies who only care about next quarter profits. They run the company into the ground.
Top of the page Bottom of the page
Jim
Posted 11/25/2009 20:53 (#938406 - in reply to #938270)
Subject: RE: History lesson needed - Fox and Field Queen choppers


Driftless SW Wisconsin

As an engineering student in Madison in the 60's one of my part time design jobs was mounting a Fox chopper on a barge used to harvest, chop and blow lake weeds from the swimming areas/boat lanes of Madison's lakes into a forage box mounted on a second barge behind. We replaced the toothed feeders with rubber rolls to squeeze some of the water out of the lake weeds.

The Fox chopper even worked well on the occasional big dead carp! Just make sure you were going into the wind when a carp came up from the submerged cutterbar! 

The chopper was very well built. A fun project.

Jim at Dawn



Edited by Jim 11/25/2009 20:55
Top of the page Bottom of the page
2+2, MN
Posted 11/26/2009 01:36 (#938759 - in reply to #938270)
Subject: RE: History lesson needed - Fox and Field Queen choppers


New Ulm, MN
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xzhZcTRJzz8



(DSCN2683.jpg)



Attachments
----------------
Attachments DSCN2683.jpg (39KB - 234 downloads)
Top of the page Bottom of the page
plowmaster
Posted 11/26/2009 10:32 (#939121 - in reply to #938759)
Subject: RE: History lesson needed - Fox and Field Queen choppers



Sucker brook, NY
where do you find parts?
Top of the page Bottom of the page
2+2, MN
Posted 11/26/2009 11:44 (#939260 - in reply to #939121)
Subject: Re: History lesson needed - Fox and Field Queen choppers


New Ulm, MN
It hasent broke down for us yet, we bought it about 8 years ago from our custom guy who was quiting choppin (he had a 80's JD SP and a FOX SP with a detriot engine and this Fox 3000 PT) There stuff was well maintined and we can call him for help on it anytime, plus i work at the canning company, they guy who buys the sweet corn silage outa the plant run it all threw a bunch of FOX 3000 choppers to hop it, he has a bucnh of parts for them. and lots of heads as they dont use them, the trash falls into a hopper in front of hte feed rolls.
Top of the page Bottom of the page
CJDave
Posted 11/26/2009 09:17 (#938994 - in reply to #938270)
Subject: RE: History lesson needed - Fox and Field Queen choppers


Southeast Iowa
When I was a kid in the late fourties, my dad was running a couple of Fox Choppers making chopped dry hay. Before good balers came along, windrow chopping hay was a real labor saver over forking loose hay. His Fox choppers had Continental engines on them and used a rubber tire and wheel setup to push down on the windrow as it entered the throat of the chopper. I remember being able to recognize Fox choppers wherever I went by those rubber tires in the windrow pickup. I'm not sure if Dad's choppers were pre-war or post-war. We had several chopped hay wagons with WWII army surplus airplane tires and wheels on them.
Top of the page Bottom of the page
Dvr
Posted 11/26/2009 09:54 (#939065 - in reply to #938270)
Subject: RE: History lesson needed - Fox and Field Queen choppers


Pipestone MN
Looks like Fox has been pretty well covered. I will try to fill in so FQ details. First time I saw one was at the 1971 Farm Progress show. But I guess they had been popular in the dehy areas for some time before that. Don't know what you saw advertised, but their impressive unit was the one with the self contained chopper box. It worked nice in the field but was kind of a bear to work on with everything so cramped together. This was a hydraulic side dump model. They also had a chain unload rear dump model that was popular with the dehy crowd. They also built a standard unit. The 200 HP Cat V8 was the standard engine with a 6-71 Detroit as a 240 HP option. FQ started as its own company, and was later acquired by Hesston. I am not sure about the Hesston pulltype choppers, as they were an exact copy of the FQ. Hesston started to paint the FQ red in 82 or 83. That is about the time the SP chopper market died and so did the FQ market. They were a simple, dependable machine. We ran a pull type and a FQ for several years. A weak spot on the FQ was the transmission. As guys began to pull wagons over 6 tons, the tranny was too light. FYI, Gehl also came out with a SP chopper in the early 60's. I am not sure if it was before Fox or not. It worked, but it wasn't near as streamlined as the Fox.
Top of the page Bottom of the page
plowmaster
Posted 11/26/2009 15:10 (#939523 - in reply to #938270)
Subject: Re: History lesson needed - Fox and Field Queen choppers



Sucker brook, NY
dad sold off a small fox chopper back in the early eighties when he went to a two row IH. the neighbor bought it, and still uses it, when he does manage to chop his own. hes got a couple of other parts machines but thats the one he uses.
Top of the page Bottom of the page
Dvr
Posted 11/27/2009 07:29 (#940273 - in reply to #938270)
Subject: RE: History lesson needed - Fox and Field Queen choppers


Pipestone MN
Hey Tyler,

Good to hear you are still around. Any chance of getting a copy of your book?
Top of the page Bottom of the page
foxchopper
Posted 11/28/2009 10:12 (#941436 - in reply to #938270)
Subject: Re: History lesson needed - Fox and Field Queen choppers


Wisconsin
Tyler - I too would be interested in getting a copy of your FQ book. Sounds like important history that should be shared!
Top of the page Bottom of the page
DanR
Posted 11/28/2009 21:37 (#941926 - in reply to #938270)
Subject: RE: History lesson needed - Fox and Field Queen choppers


SW Sask
Hey, Tyler. That book sounds great - is there a way to buy a copy? Post some info on this site, and I'm sure you'll be overrun with orders!

thanks for preserving some history.
danr
Top of the page Bottom of the page
thall1976
Posted 11/29/2009 19:20 (#943023 - in reply to #941926)
Subject: RE: History lesson needed - Fox and Field Queen choppers



Field Queen Inc.
Hey fellas

Here is to hoping I can find a small publisher to make a short run of these..... just have some issues to work out first.

I have been making them myself on the home computer here and until I get one spit out it takes about 2 hours to print and put it together and almost 60 dollars worth of ink!!!!! Hee Hee!!

I want to see what I can do to save it in some kind of format so I can email it to you folks to view on your computer..... Im just not very tech savvy, but if I get it figured out you will be the first to know.

I really want to get that story out there someday.... I appriciate the support.

Tyler Hall


Top of the page Bottom of the page
cybold
Posted 4/11/2011 00:39 (#1718806 - in reply to #938270)
Subject: RE: History lesson needed - Fox and Field Queen choppers


does anyone know where I can find a sharping machine for the original rear dump choppers? I'd pay a good price if you have one that works. Please write me at ron@cybold.com Thanks!
Top of the page Bottom of the page
Jump to forum :
Search this forum
Printer friendly version
E-mail a link to this thread

(Delete all cookies set by this site)